Sunday, September 18, 2016

Teaching the Tasks (part 3): Addressing the Questions We Ask When Designing Tasks

  • Does the task address the student’s educational goals?
  •  Is the task multi-modal?
  •  Does the task incorporate student’s interests and strengths?
  •  Is the task created using visual cues that will be meaningful to the individual student?
  •  Are pieces of the task organized systematically?
  •  Is the task designed so that the student can manage it independently?
  •  Has the student mastered the task?  

We addressed the first question in the Teaching the Tasks part 1 and the second question in the Teaching the Tasks part 2 . This entry will discuss the third question: 

Does the Task Address the Students’ Interests and Strengths?

Many of our students have difficulty engaging with a task and sustaining attention once engaged.  We find, if we incorporate their interests into our task designs, they are able to pay attention quite well.  Assess how easy or difficult it is to capture your students’ attention.  If they need help with this ability, determine both their interests and their areas of strength and how these could be used when working on their educational goals. 



To encourage a student’s participation for a turn-taking game with a peer, we added pictures of his favorite toys, Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends.  While throwing the balls into the basket, he and his playmate stand on the pictures.  His interest in the characters increases the likelihood that he will join the game. Once engaged, however, he learns playing the game with a friend can also be interesting and fun.



This student had a special interest in cats and knew the names of most breeds.  We used this interest when creating a task to work on her filing skills.  She had to identify the first letter of the breed and then place the cat card behind that alphabet letter.




Many of our students have both interests and strength in letters and numbers.  This student did not like touching squishy textures.  By placing the texture (pudding) into a plastic bag and asking him to touch for the purpose of writing letters, he was willing to give it a try.


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